Forbes Talks To Danny Goldberg About Nirvana Book

Forbes Talks To Danny Goldberg About Nirvana Book

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LOS ANGELES (CelebrityAccess) Former manager for Nirvana and Hole, Danny Goldberg, is about to publish “Serving the Servant: Remembering Kurt Cobain,” about Kurt Cobain and his famous band and talked to Forbes about the book and the elements surrounding it.

The book will comes out tomorrow, about the same time as the 25th anniversary of Cobain’s death, April 5. Cobain said Goldberg was “like a ‘second father'” and the manager not only shepherded the band through the launch of Nevermind but he was the last to eulogize Cobain at his funeral in 1994.

Forbes calls the book “expansive and insightful,” and the magazine’s Russ Espinoza interviewed Goldberg in a two-part series, the first published March 25.

Some of the questions and answers:

Espinoza asked if Courtney Love’s pursuit and marriage to Cobain had pure intentions. Goldberg responded, in short, “I don’t know how to measure somebody’s intentions, but there’s no question that they were in love with each other, and that was what motivated them being together—or without that they wouldn’t have been together.”

Goldberg was asked if he was aware of Cobain’s fascination with guns and if it concerned him. Goldberg said, “I was not aware of that interest of his. I didn’t know he had guns around him until I heard these stories after he was dead. I am not a gun person, and he probably would’ve known that, so it was never subject that came up. ”

Espinoza asked if Cobain may have ultimately used a planned collaboration with Michael Stipe to break up Nirvana.

“I think it’s likely given the wide range of his talent and musical interest that Nirvana wouldn’t have been the vehicle for everything he wanted to do over the course of a lifetime, if he had lived longer,” Goldberg said. “And I think frankly, it’s very likely that Dave Grohl would’ve wanted to do what he eventually did.”

Goldberg, in part two of the interview, was asked if he shared Cobain’s opinion that a lot of mainstream rock was sexist and homophobic and if he at least understood that perspective.


“Oh completely!” Goldberg responded. “Absolutely. First of all, I agreed with him about that. Secondly, I think he was torn: I think he liked the music. He liked Led Zeppelin’s music—and AC/DC. But the lyrics were not something that he felt comfortable with, for exactly the reason that you said.”

The first part of the interview is available here and Part II here.

The book is available here.

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