Sir Elton John Lets Loose On Security With Litany Of Expletives


LEICESTERSHIRE COUNTY, UK (CelebrityAccess) — Sir Elton John may be knighted, but last weekend the 69-year-old singer showed his audience he can swear like a sailor. The security guards were the focus of the foul tirade who were trying to stop fans dancing on their seats at the weekend concert.

Fans said they believed the well-known family-man was so angered by the over-zealous behavior that he finished his act without saying goodbye or playing an encore, according to the Daily Mail.

Elton John was entertaining with his vast catalogue of songs for the 17,000 fans at Leicestershire County Cricket Ground, on Saturday, which was one stop on his 65–date tour to promote his latest album Wonderful Crazy Night.

Elton John felt the security guards were overzealous in their efforts to get the people who were trying dance and enjoy the show back in their seats.

Fans welcomed Elton's intervention on Saturday but were disappointed that the Crocodile Rock crooner ended the show with a curt exit and without encore.

Simon Herne, who paid £67.50 (approximately $95 US) for his ticket, told the Daily Mirror: 'When it started at 7:30pm the music was fantastic but Elton was clearly infuriated by whatever was going on at the front. In the end the whole thing finished at 9.35pm, far earlier than advertised.

'He didn't say goodbye, there was no encore, he just went off and that was it. It was a shame. Clearly there was something going on with the security guards that really annoyed him.'

Julia Hage added: 'Hated the fun police who wouldn't let me stand at the end of the row so I could see… After Elton intervened we were able to stand, dance and drink in the 30m of grass which separated us from the next block.'

Last night a spokesman for Elton denied that the singer had ended the show early.

He said: 'Elton played a full set of well over two hours. He came onstage earlier than normal, so that's why it finished when it did. He did ask a few of the security people to relax and let the audience stand up and dance if they wanted to.'