10,000 Fans Tune In To Code Orange Record Release Concert Live Stream

10,000 Fans Tune In To Code Orange Record Release Concert Live Stream

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(Hypebot) — Following the cancellation of their album releasing show over concerns relating to COVID – 19, the band Code Orange opted for a different sort of performance, instead choosing to do a livestream from an empty venue, with some impressive results.

Guest post by James Shotwell of Haulix

After canceling their album release show over Coronavirus concerns, Code Orange found a way to deliver a game-changing solution to concert restrictions.

Coronavirus concerns have canceled or delayed virtually every concert and sporting event scheduled for March and early April. The vast majority of musicians and touring crew members are currently out of work, and there is no clear timeline on when their jobs will resume. It could be three weeks, or it could be two months. Some say it could be even longer, but we are doing our best to keep hopes high.

Rock band Code Orange is one of many artists whose plans were derailed by the spread of Coronavirus in the last week. The group’s long-promoted new album, Underneath, released on Friday, March 13. The band planned a massive release show for Saturday, March 14, in their home state of Pennsylvania to celebrate the album, but then the virus hit and put the safety of everyone into question.

Understanding the need to keep themselves, their crew, and their fans safe, Code Orange quickly developed a workaround. The band would still perform their release show where they booked months prior, but there would be no openers and no audience. Instead, Code Orange would partner with a video team to present their full performance over Twitch, a popular live-streaming platform, for free.

On Saturday night, Code Orange took the stage with a production that included lights and custom video animations. The livestream blended multiple camera angles with video overlays showcasing the animation that was created exclusively for the Underneath release.

Watch LAST ONES LEFT: Fear of the End // 3.14 9pm EST from codeorangeofficial on www.twitch.tv

More than 10,000 people watched the livestream as it happened, and thousands more have viewed the performance in the hours that followed. That figure is far higher than the capacity of the venue and much larger than the attendance at any traditional Code Orange show. The band also received numerous donations from viewers before and after the performance, though the specific amount given is not available to the public.


Through their creative thinking, Code Orange is already changing the way many in music are looking at the problem currently facing musicians. Touring may not be possible for the foreseeable future. However, high-quality broadcasts like the experience created by Code Orange could create a new revenue stream for any musician or group able to stream a performance.

There is another perk to live streaming events, and that is the ability to create new fans and sell additional tickets. Many people likely watched Code Orange for the first time because of their Twitch performance, and those who enjoyed the set are now more likely to stream their music, buy merchandise, or see the band on tour. Current fans also have a new reason to love the group. Their quick-thinking in this situation should instill fans’ faith in the band’s lasting appeal moving forward.

Streaming performance is nothing new, but the technology has struggled to find a broad audience. While several platforms have found an audience by broadcasting acoustic and stripped-down performance, which are easier to capture, the majority of full-band performances are only available through high-profile festival streams. That is due in large part to cost, but those prices are dropping.

James Shotwell is the Director of Customer Engagement at Haulix and host of the company’s podcast, Inside Music. He is also a public speaker known for promoting careers in the entertainment industry, as well as an entertainment journalist with over a decade of experience. His bylines include Rolling Stone, Alternative Press, Substream Magazine, Nu Sound, and Under The Gun Review, among other popular outlets.

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